High School
Departments & Courses, In Brief

High School Courses

World and Classical Languages

Since High School is the time to consider adding a new language to your program, we are giving you brief descriptions of the different languages we offer to assist you.

Placement in sections is done by the department until the students reach elective levels. You must begin your course registration by signing up for language first.  Many of the courses have only one section.

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES:

Latin: “To read the Latin and Greek authors in their original, is a sublime luxury, and it is an innocent enjoyment... I thank on my knees him who directed my early education, for having put into my possession this rich source of delight; and I would not exchange it for anything which I could then have acquired, and have not since acquired.” (Thomas Jefferson - Letter to Priestley, Jan. 27, 1800)

The study of Latin presents an enriching opportunity to engage with the language, literature, history, philosophy, art, government, and religion of the Roman empire, and to explore its profound influence on our own civilization. Students discover that 65% of English words (and more than 90% of those over two syllables) come from Latin. By systematically grappling with Latin's precise and logical syntax, the students exercise and develop analytic thinking, bolstered by an acute attention to detail. The practice with close-reading that translating Latin texts provides helps students to build text-based arguments and understand how rhetoric may be employed in English as well as Latin. Translating Roman literature allows students to reach into the past and explore the culture of ancient Rome from the Romans’ own perspective, thereby gaining insight into their own cultural moment and how the present is shaped by the past.

WORLD LANGUAGES:

French: As a language employed by the United Nations, UNESCO, NATO, the International Red Cross, and spoken by millions of people worldwide, the French language provides a means of expression and communication for many people, organizations, and endeavors. French teachers present throughout our curriculum voices and contributions of francophone speakers while helping students develop their skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing. 

Spanish:  Spain is an integral member of the European Union and U.S. relations with Latin America continue to gain greater importance. Spanish speakers are in high demand and the study of Spanish is becoming more desirable than ever.  Mastering Spanish will open many doors, not only to foreign cultures, but also to many aspects of our own culture locally and nationally. Students of Spanish at Dalton have the unique opportunity to apply their knowledge on a daily basis through direct contact with a wide range of Hispanic people, and through their exposure to an ever-growing variety of music, theater, film, daily publications, and radio and TV in Spanish.  In addition to the development of oral and writing skills, our students’ interaction with teachers from several Spanish-speaking countries, enriches their language experience. Technology and interactive multimedia play a significant role in our curriculum.

Chinese (Mandarin): Chinese claims more native speakers than any other language and China is considered one of the world’s superpowers.  In the course of the next few decades, it seems inevitable that China will become more central to U.S. endeavors abroad, and the ability to speak Chinese will likewise become a valuable asset in many careers and fields.  In addition, the Chinese language is the gateway to one of the world’s great cultures, whose customs, social structures and literature stretch back 5000 years. Chinese is special among Dalton’s language offerings for its use of characters rather than an alphabet to write and also for its tonal phonetics. These intriguing features make Mandarin quite different from European languages, and with that difference comes an extraordinary perspective. Successful students of Mandarin are savvy, effective “global citizens” who can engage authentically with Chinese cultures, both in New York City, and around the world.
  • Latin 1

    Beginning study of grammar, vocabulary, and translation.

    Text
    : First Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Latin 2

    Continuation of Latin 1.  Upper level grammar is introduced alongside prolonged translations.  

    Text: First Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin 3 - Selected Latin Authors

    Students in this course review the curriculum of upper level grammar and syntax in tandem with translation of texts taken from ancient authors, including Livy, Eutropius, Caesar and Ovid.  This class emphasizes the development of translation skills, the ability to identify grammar and understand syntax, and the expansion of vocabulary.
     
    Text: Second Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade
    Prerequisite: Latin 2
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin Lyric Poetry

    Students read the poetry of Catullus and Horace.  Poems are read with attention paid to themes, poetic devices, contemporary cultural philosophy, historical background and metrical forms.  The Greek influences on Catullus and Horace are examined, as is modern poetry, which has been influenced to a great extent by these authors.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. 

    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin Lyric Poetry 'A'

    Students read the poetry of Catullus and Horace.  Poems are read with attention paid to themes, poetic devices, contemporary cultural philosophy, historical background and metrical forms.  The Greek influences on Catullus and Horace are examined, as is modern poetry, which has been influenced to a great extent by these authors.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.

    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 1

    For the first three levels of formal language study, textbooks and workbooks are supplemented by Dalton Assignments. For levels 4 through electives, Assignments provide the scaffolding for vocabulary and features of French syntax as students read, discuss, and write about a wide array of contemporary ideas and issues presented in works of fiction and non-fiction.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • French 2

    For the first three levels of formal language study, textbooks and workbooks are supplemented by Dalton Assignments. For levels 4 through electives, Assignments provide the scaffolding for vocabulary and features of French syntax as students read, discuss, and write about a wide array of contemporary ideas and issues presented in works of fiction and non-fiction.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 3

    For the first three levels of formal language study, textbooks and workbooks are supplemented by Dalton Assignments. For levels 4 through electives, Assignments provide the scaffolding for vocabulary and features of French syntax as students read, discuss, and write about a wide array of contemporary ideas and issues presented in works of fiction and non-fiction.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 3 'A'

    For the first three levels of formal language study, textbooks and workbooks are supplemented by Dalton Assignments. For levels 4 through electives, Assignments provide the scaffolding for vocabulary and features of French syntax as students read, discuss, and write about a wide array of contemporary ideas and issues presented in works of fiction and non-fiction.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 4

    For the first three levels of formal language study, textbooks and workbooks are supplemented by Dalton Assignments. For levels 4 through electives, Assignments provide the scaffolding for vocabulary and features of French syntax as students read, discuss, and write about a wide array of contemporary ideas and issues presented in works of fiction and non-fiction.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 4 'A'

    For the first three levels of formal language study, textbooks and workbooks are supplemented by Dalton Assignments. For levels 4 through electives, Assignments provide the scaffolding for vocabulary and features of French syntax as students read, discuss, and write about a wide array of contemporary ideas and issues presented in works of fiction and non-fiction.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French Nationalism

    This course offers an analytical insight into a selection of works by French-speaking contemporary writers from the Caribbean and North and West Africa and the determining social, cultural and political events that helped shape their literary environment. We will read authors including Ousmane Sembène, Leopold S. Senghor, Aimé Césaire, Frantz Fanon, Mouloud Feraoun, Assia Djebbar, Tahar Ben Djelloun, and Henri Alleg, among others.  Students will explore the idea of “Négritude” through an in-depth study of works by the members of  "l'étudiant noir" a group established to eradicate the colonial imposed artificial divisions of the various African nations and to cement the African man under one banner. Literature and film will help to contextualize the political backdrop of post-World War II African politics and the elements that paved the way to independence for one third of the continent in the early 1960s. This context will situate the nationalistic sentiments in the selected readings. Along with readings, students will strengthen their listening skills by viewing several important films on this topic. They will also write in-class and at home essays and prepare class presentations to help extend and expand their oral and written proficiency in French.  

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.

    Prerequisite:  French 4, French 4‘A’, or above
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French Autobiography

    This course is designed to develop reading, writing and discussion skills in French.  We read autobiographical narratives and discuss short films grounded in childhood experiences:  authors includeEric-Emmanuel Schmitt, Gisèle Pineau, Fatima Mernissi, and Camara Laye.  Students explore through class discussion the ways authors process their perceptions of family dynamics, social contexts provided by school, neighborhood, and cultural norms, and larger political questions that filter into their lives as they near adulthood.  Assignments provide vocabulary to enhance reading comprehension and to develop conversation skills in French. Students also learn some vocabulary for persuasive argumentation in French.
     
    Prerequisite: French 4, French 4‘A’, or above
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French Autobiography 'A'

    This course is designed to develop reading, writing and discussion skills in French.  We read autobiographical narratives and discuss short films grounded in childhood experiences:  authors includeEric-Emmanuel Schmitt, Gisèle Pineau, Fatima Mernissi, and Camara Laye.  Students explore through class discussion the ways authors process their perceptions of family dynamics, social contexts provided by school, neighborhood, and cultural norms, and larger political questions that filter into their lives as they near adulthood.  Assignments provide vocabulary to enhance reading comprehension and to develop conversation skills in French. Students also learn some vocabulary for persuasive argumentation in French.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. 
     
    Prerequisite: French 4, French 4‘A’, or above
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 1

    Textbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1-2 (Mandarin 1-4) and A New China (for A Changing China).  Ancillary materials include teacher-made handouts, songs, videos, interactive websites , and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Mandarin Chinese 2

    Textbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1-2 (Mandarin 1-4) and A New China (for A Changing China).  Ancillary materials include teacher-made handouts, songs, videos, interactive websites , and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 3

    Textbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1-2 (Mandarin 1-4) and A New China (for A Changing China).  Ancillary materials include teacher-made handouts, songs, videos, interactive websites , and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 4

    Textbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1-2 (Mandarin 1-4) and A New China (for A Changing China).  Ancillary materials include teacher-made handouts, songs, videos, interactive websites , and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • A Changing China

    A Changing China assumes a working familiarity with the basic structures of Mandarin and a corpus of approximately 700 common Chinese characters. In this course, students use their textbook, A New China, as a tool to explore a large variety of authentic, contemporary Mandarin-language materials, including websites, television programs, excerpts from articles, opinion pieces, fiction and films. Through analysis of these and other media, students become familiar with mainstream and alternative Chinese attitudes, opinions and styles. Through dialogue, role-play, research and writing, students learn to express and understand educated views of Chinese culture and society. Students acquire roughly 300 new characters, and class is conducted entirely in Mandarin.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Chinese History Through Stories

    Chinese History Through Stories is a course for students who have successfully completed A Changing China or are comparably conversant and literate in Mandarin. In this class, students will read and analyze short stories of major political, military, economic, cultural, and technological events and influential figures of Chinese history, and their impact on and relevance to modern day China. We also examine and learn to use the ever-so-important four-character idioms along the way. We watch and discuss several movies and movie excerpts based on popular historical events and legends such as Hero and The Battle at Red Cliff, and, when appropriate, compare them with similar Western stories.  Successful students emerge with a set of cultural and linguistic tools that allow them to engage China in a nuanced, sophisticated way. Class is conducted entirely in Mandarin.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Lands/People of Contemporary China

    Lands and People of Contemporary China is a seminar-level course. Chinese History Through Stories or equivalent proficiency with spoken and written Mandarin is prerequisite. Students in this course will study in depth the people and culture of China by taking a simulated journey around major regions of the country. While the focus will mainly be contemporary, we will examine historical roots of certain customs and landmarks.  China is a diverse country with more than 50 ethnic groups, all of whom have rich culture and customs. Even among the majority Han ethnicity, every region has its own unique flavor. So what is China? What does it mean for people and things to be Chinese? In this course, we examine the different people, customs, food and landmarks of mainland China. We will read authentic Chinese texts from print and digital media, and explore authentic audiovisual content available on the Internet. Class will be discussion based.  Class participation is crucial to this course. Students must be able to read authentic materials and to compose short and meaningful essays in Chinese.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 1

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Spanish 2

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 3

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 3 'A'

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 4

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 4 ‘A’: We New Yorkers “Nosotros los Neoyorquinos”

    This course is organized into thematic units that will involve students in a study of the historical, social and cultural impact of Spanish-speaking New Yorkers, both in the present time, and throughout history. Students will strengthen and further develop their speaking, listening, reading and writing in Spanish as they explore different Latin-American communities. Students will interact with Latinos in and around New York City, and use technology to connect with Spanish-speakers around the world in order to conduct oral history interviews, design and conduct research, and create joint projects. Major themes include communities, immigration, the environment, Spanish language and cultures, and the arts.  Students’ progress will be assessed through evaluation of proficiency in language as well as demonstrated understanding of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. 

    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish Conversation and Composition

    The Conversation and Composition course aims to strengthen speaking and writing skills in Spanish.  We begin the year with a discussion of potentially controversial topics and questions pertaining to each.  Students choose discussion topics and the order in which they are debated. In the past, these themes have included alcohol and drug policies, censorship, violence, affirmative action, human rights, immigration, and current issues.  In–class discussions and debates typically involve initial free discussion, identification of key questions, some research and a paper or a formal in-class presentation. Writing may take a creative approach in addition to the formal paper.  Students are expected to come out of each unit better informed about the different sides of each issue. Reading articles and literary excerpts, listening to music and watching movies are additional means for students to expand their breadth of expression and understanding of culture in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4 or departmental permission
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish: Literature and Food in Latin America 'A'

    In this course, students are invited to explore 20th century Latin American literary works through the lens of food.  We will analyze literature written for and by native Spanish speakers.  In the course, we will compare and contrast cultures and perspectives through topics such as Poets in the Kitchen, Authors and their Favorite Dishes, Literary Recipes for Love, and Savory Myths.  By the end of the year, students will be able to understand the complex network of historical, political, cultural and social contexts that influenced the creation of these works through the thematic ingredients of society, gender, time, space and reality.  Readings include short stories, poetry and short fiction by Cortázar, Esquivel, Borges and Neruda among others.  Students will have the opportunity to improve their reading, writing and oral skills via class discussions, a portfolio of commentaries and self-reflection, and in-class essays. 

    Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4 'A' and departmental permission
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish: Language and Culture

    Lengua y Cultura” will give the students the opportunity to explore Hispanic culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Through this course, students will develop awareness of and appreciation for the different cultures throughout the Hispanic world and compare them with their own communities. Some of the topics covered will be Global challenges, the Arts, Contemporary Life, Communities, Science and Technology, Personality and Personalities, Hispanic history and Literature. Students will present their own opinions and develop arguments, both orally and in writing. They will learn how to identify different registers and address different audiences (e.g. how to write an email, text message, a formal letter, an essay, how to do an oral presentation, etc.). Students will be exposed to Spanish spoken by native speakers, with different regional pronunciations through authentic cultural audioclips and videos. Part of this course will be developed by the teacher, and part of it will be developed by the students, according to their interests and passions.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.

    Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4 or above
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish: Language and Culture ‘A’

    Lengua y Cultura” will give the students the opportunity to explore Hispanic culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Through this course, students will develop awareness of and appreciation for the different cultures throughout the Hispanic world and compare them with their own communities. Some of the topics covered will be Global challenges, the Arts, Contemporary Life, Communities, Science and Technology, Personality and Personalities, Hispanic history and Literature. Students will present their own opinions and develop arguments, both orally and in writing. They will learn how to identify different registers and address different audiences (e.g. how to write an email, text message, a formal letter, an essay, how to do an oral presentation, etc.). Students will be exposed to Spanish spoken by native speakers, with different regional pronunciations through authentic cultural audioclips and videos. Part of this course will be developed by the teacher, and part of it will be developed by the students, according to their interests and passions.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.

    Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4 or above
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish: Hispanic Cinema

    This course offers a window into Spanish and Latin American societies and cultures through cinema. It works toward broadening the knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world and offers students the opportunity to exercise the spoken and written language. The curriculum includes films from four countries that broadly represent geographical and cultural regions of the Spanish-speaking world and the major centers of film production: Cuba, Argentina, Spain, and Mexico.  Projects allow students to study films from other countries as well. The students make brief presentations on pertinent historical, cultural, and political issues for each country that serve as the context for that country’s films. Students also keep a regular diary to note responses, observations, impressions, and questions about the scenes viewed in class. Semester projects allow the student to explore film further in a scholarly or creative manner, for example the study of a film or director, a sound score, cinematographic techniques or the creation of a film short, music for a scene, or an original script.  

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. 

    Prerequisite:  one year of elective or departmental permission
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Japanese Language through Culture I

    This full-year course is a unique combination of Japanese culture and language, weaving cultural comparison with the study of basic Japanese language and grammar. While examining various cultural topics such as literature, art, lifestyle and economy, students learn the basics of the Japanese writing system (Hiragana and Katakana), grammar and vocabulary. Through varied synchronous and asynchronous assignments, including hands-on projects and face-to-face communications, students develop their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. The cultural study and discussions are conducted in English, with topics alternating every two to three weeks. The ultimate goal of this course is to raise awareness and appreciation of different cultures through learning the basics of the Japanese language. The focus of this course is 60 percent on language and 40 percent on culture. This course is appropriate for beginner-level students.

    This course is offered through our partnership with Global Online Academy (GOA).
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Japanese Language through Culture II

    Through language learning, students in this course share their voices, cultivate global perspectives, and foster an appreciation for self and others. Students further develop the speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills introduced in Japanese Language Through Culture I. . Each unit follows the IPA model (Integrated Performance Assessment), blending three modes of communication: interpretation of authentic material in Japanese, synchronous and asynchronous practice in speaking and writing, and oral and written presentations. Each unit focuses on one of the following cultural topics: Design and Expression, Ecology, Entertainment, East meets West, Harmony, and Nature. In addition, students will have the opportunity to select and pursue topics of their own interest. Grammar topics will cover the essential forms that are typically introduced in the second and third year of a high school Japanese program. By learning the Dictionary Form, Nominalizer, TE form, TA form, NAI form, and Noun Modifier, students are able to add more complexity to their sentence construction. In doing so, they shift from forming simple sentences to communicating in coherent paragraphs. As online learners, students are expected to exhibit superb time management and communication skills, as well as take ownership of their learning. While grammar instruction will be delivered through asynchronous work and face-to-face meetings, much of the course content will be curated and created by students through their research and collaboration. The focus of this course is 60 percent on language and 40 percent on culture. Prerequisite: Japanese Language Through Culture I or permission from the instructor.

    This course is offered through our partnership with Global Online Academy (GOA).
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Japanese Language through Culture III

    Students in Japanese III have mastered most of the conjugation patterns (TE/TA form, dictionary form, and NAI form) that are necessary to speak and write in complex structures. While advancing their grammatical knowledge (including giving and receiving, potential form, and honorific form), students will compare and examine similar functions and their subtle differences. In speaking, students are allowed to speak in an informal/casual style with each other and with the teacher in order to solidify their control of the Plain Form. Interpersonal communications will be done through face-to-face conversation and recorded messages. In reading and listening, students will curate, share, and practice grasping the gist of authentic materials. Materials may include TV commercials, news, movies, children’s books, online newspapers, and cooking recipes. Students will work on creative, expository,and analytical writing (comparing-and-contrasting in AP format). Semester 1 will incorporate JLPT N5 exam material. Taking the exam is not necessary, but encouraged. In Semester 2, students will participate in that GOA Catalyst Conference.

    This course is offered through our partnership with Global Online Academy (GOA).
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires preapproval
  • Arabic Language through Culture I

    Through study of Levantine (Jordanian) Arabic and the Arabic writing system, students develop novice proficiency in interpersonal communication. Students will be able to communicate in spontaneous spoken conversations on everyday topics, including personal introductions, families, daily routines, and preferences, using a variety of practiced or memorized words, phrases, simple sentences, and questions. 

    This course is offered through our partnership with Global Online Academy (GOA).
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Arabic Language through Culture III

    Students in Arabic III have demonstrated intermediate interpersonal proficiency in Arabic (MSA or a dialect) through two years in Arabic Language Through Culture or other coursework, and have demonstrated an ability to work online independently and reliably with instructors and peers in Arabic Language Through Culture or another GOA class. Students in Arabic III will have opportunities to direct their own study through choice of material and topic. They will use Arabic to interact with native speakers on topics of their choosing, and to explore topics of interest through a variety of media (written works, audio, video, face-to-face interviews). 

    This course is offered through our partnership with Global Online Academy (GOA).
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Atelier: A Creative Writing Course in French 'A'

    “Who am I, in French? I really don't know -- a bit of everything, perhaps.”

    What happens when writers decide to compose in a language that is not their native one? What do they lose and, most importantly, what do they gain? This course will explore these questions and encourage students to find their own original voice in French by 1) exploring universal themes that are both personal and meaningful (such as childhood, what constitutes a good horror story, food writing, love, and family) and how each author expresses those themes into their work 2) engaging in in-class writing exercises, such as le pastiche, in which they will add their own creative spin to a theme, just as Marcel Duchamp did when he added a mustache to the Mona Lisa. The first semester will focus on the art of the short story where students will discuss what constitutes a compelling narrative in the works of writers such as Guy de Maupassant, Émile Zola, Marcel Proust, Jean-Marie le Clézio, Georges Perec, Marcel Proust, and Jean-Paul Sartre. The second semester will concentrate on poetry by examining all forms of the poem, from the classical to the surreal, through the lens of poets such as Villon, Rimbaud, Baudelaire, and Bréton. Students will not only look at literary examples, but excerpts from an array of films, music, and visual art. 
     
    Prerequisite: French 4A and/or one year of elective or departmental permission
    Full Year Course: 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 1

    In French we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first two years of study.  Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all features of syntax and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • French 2

    In French we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first two years of study.  Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all features of syntax and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 3

    In French we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first two years of study.  Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all features of syntax and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French 3 'A'

    In French we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first two years of study.  Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all features of syntax and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French Cinema 'A'

    This course aims at enhancing the studentsí understanding of the culture of France and the Francophone world by focusing on the relation of films to French history and culture.~ We examine how French society and contemporary filmmakers view and address major historical, social and cultural events. Students will be introduced to a broad range of contemporary issues: the legacy of colonialism and decolonization, history of immigration and access to French citizenship, social exclusion, social unrest: (Mai 68 and riots of the suburbs in 2005), secularism (laïcité), economic challenges (welfare state, globalization, and the healthcare deficit). During the study of each film, students research and analyze cultural, social, and historical themes. This course is designed to strengthen all four skills - reading, writing, speaking and listening. Reading and writing skills in particular are developed through the analysis of cultural readings. In addition, students have the opportunity to create projects, and discuss and debate a variety of themes in French.
     
    Prerequisite:  French 4‘A’, or above
    Full year course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • French Conversation

    The Conversation class is designed to give students a chance to build their French proficiency with competence and confidence, while learning about the Francophone world.  The course will be based on real-world themes, current events, and authentic texts from a variety of francophone voices. The course gives students with different perspectives and learning styles opportunities to participate in class and to build on material acquired through her/his/their career at Dalton. This course will acknowledge, promote, and incorporate intersectionality and students’ intersecting identities. 

    Students will hone their skills in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. As students engage in debates and small group discussions, they will develop both their language proficiency and critical thinking skills. Speaking functions include: maintaining a conversation, persuading and dissuading, narrating, describing, comparing, expressing and supporting one’s opinion, hypothesizing, giving solutions, and more. 

    Requires Preapproval
    Prerequisite:  French 4‘A’, or above
    Full year course, 1.0 credit
  • IS: Language

    Independent studies are opportunities for 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students to pursue ideas and passions not covered by current course work.  

    Students must complete this form to apply for preapproval.

    Requires Preapproval
    Graded Pass/Fail
    Fall or Spring Semester Course, 0.25 credits
  • Latin 1

    Beginning study of grammar, vocabulary, and translation.

    Text: First Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Latin 2

    Continuation of Latin 1.  Upper level grammar is introduced alongside prolonged translations.  

    Text: First Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin 3 - Selected Latin Authors

    Students in this course review the curriculum of upper level grammar and syntax in tandem with translation of texts taken from ancient authors, including Livy, Eutropius, Caesar and Ovid.  This class emphasizes the development of translation skills, the ability to identify grammar and understand syntax, and the expansion of vocabulary.
     
    Text: Second Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade
    Prerequisite: Latin 2
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin: Identity and Empire

    This is the first class in which students make the leap to pure translation of text. Grammar and solid, idiomatic translation are a continued focus. The course will begin with selections from Caesar’s De Bello Gallico through which students will become conversant in standard Latin prose style. Students will learn about Roman expansion and the Roman perspective on themselves and the other. Students may also encounter works by authors such as Pliny, Livy, and Suetonius.  Through these texts, students will become acquainted with Roman historiography, ethnography, geography, and the Roman army. Students will show their comfort with the subject matter through daily translations and regular assessments including grammar, vocabulary, and translations.  

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. 

    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin: Identity and Empire ‘A’

    This is the first class in which students make the leap to pure translation of text. Grammar and solid, idiomatic translation are a continued focus. The course will begin with selections from Caesar’s De Bello Gallico through which students will become conversant in standard Latin prose style. Students will learn about Roman expansion and the Roman perspective on themselves and the other. Students may also encounter works by authors such as Pliny, Livy, and Suetonius.  Through these texts, students will become acquainted with Roman historiography, ethnography, geography, and the Roman army. Students will show their comfort with the subject matter through daily translations and regular assessments including grammar, vocabulary, and translations.  

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. 

    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin: SPQR - Politicians, Propaganda, and the Polity

    This study of Roman prose literature evokes the conflicts and crises of Roman political life. Readings will focus on writings from prose authors, such as Cicero, Livy, Pliny, Sallust and Suetonius and may include some poetic works. Through these authors and their works students will broaden understanding of Roman institutions, government, and civic life.  Students will also examine in depth the figures of speech and rhetorical devices that make up the artistry of these authors. Comparative studies will involve looking at famous speeches of the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will show their comfort with the subject matter through daily translations and regular assessments including grammar, vocabulary, and translations.  

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.

    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin: SPQR - Politicians, Propaganda, and the Polity ‘A’

    This study of Roman prose literature evokes the conflicts and crises of Roman political life. Readings will focus on writings from prose authors, such as Cicero, Livy, Pliny, Sallust and Suetonius and may include some poetic works. Through these authors and their works students will broaden understanding of Roman institutions, government, and civic life. Students will also examine in depth the figures of speech and rhetorical devices that make up the artistry of these authors. Comparative studies will involve looking at famous speeches of the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will show their comfort with the subject matter through daily translations and regular assessments including grammar, vocabulary, and translations.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.

    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin: The Epic Tradition in the Augustan Age

    This study of Roman Epic poetry will be an in-depth exploration into the themes prevalent throughout poetry.  This course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to texts rich in a variety of topics, ranging from philosophy and mythology to propaganda and romance.  Through selections from Virgil’s Aeneid, students will come into contact with the plight of the refugee and his search to found the Roman race. Discussions and assignments focus on literal and free translation of the text, on poetic meter, major themes, the figurative language of epic verse, and the socio-political reformation of the Augustan Age. Less traditional epic works, like Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura may provide points of context and comparison.  Students will show their comfort with the subject matter through daily translations and regular assessments including grammar, vocabulary, and translations.  

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. 
     
    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin: The Epic Tradition in the Augustan Age ‘A’

    This study of Roman Epic poetry will be an in-depth exploration into the themes prevalent throughout poetry.  This course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to texts rich in a variety of topics, ranging from philosophy and mythology to propaganda and romance.  Through selections from Virgil’s Aeneid, students will come into contact with the plight of the refugee and his search to found the Roman race. Discussions and assignments focus on literal and free translation of the text, on poetic meter, major themes, the figurative language of epic verse, and the socio-political reformation of the Augustan Age. Less traditional epic works, like Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura may provide points of context and comparison.  Students will show their comfort with the subject matter through daily translations and regular assessments including grammar, vocabulary, and translations.  

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. 
     
    Texts vary
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 1

    Texbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1 and A New China for A Changing China.  Ancillary materials include audiovisual materials, online exercises, interactive flash cards, and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts. 
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Mandarin Chinese 2

    Texbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1 and A New China for A Changing China.  Ancillary materials include audiovisual materials, online exercises, interactive flash cards, and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts. 

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 3

    Texbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1 and A New China for A Changing China. Ancillary materials include audiovisual materials, online exercises, interactive flash cards, and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts. 
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 3 ‘A’

    Textbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1-2 (Mandarin 1-4) and A New China (for A Changing China).  Ancillary materials include teacher-made handouts, songs, videos, interactive websites , and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.  

    Requires Preapproval
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Mandarin Chinese 4 ‘A’

    Textbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1-2 (Mandarin 1-4) and A New China (for A Changing China).  Ancillary materials include teacher-made handouts, songs, videos, interactive websites , and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.  

    Requires Preapproval
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Spanish 1

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Spanish 2

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 3

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 3 'A'

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues.  Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, students are exposed to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish: Literature, Identities, and Struggle ‘A’

    In this advanced year-long course, students are encouraged to explore —through the lens of literature—the role that race, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status have played in the works of prominent authors in Peninsular and Latin American literature. Students discuss a variety of literature (novels, short stories, poetry, plays, and articles). Oral and writing assignments require in-depth analysis while incorporating a sophisticated use of the language. By the end of this course, students gain a better understanding of literary genres as well as of the intersection between literature and race, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status.

    Requires Preapproval
    Prerequisite:  Spanish: Literature and Food in Latin America ‘A’ 
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit

Faculty

  • Photo of Lori Langer de Ramirez
    Lori Langer de Ramirez
    Director of World and Classical Languages
    SUNY, New Paltz - B.A.
    CUNY, Queens College - M.S.
    Teachers College, Columbia University - Ed.D.
  • Photo of Allison Albino
    Allison Albino
    French Teacher
    New York University - M.A.
    Sarah Lawrence College - B.A.
  • Photo of Johanna Braff
    Johanna Braff
    Middle and High School Latin Teacher
    Swarthmore College - B.A.
    University of Pennsylvania - Post Baccalaureate
    University of Maryland - M.A.
    C.U.N.Y. - M.Phil.
  • Photo of Wyatt Crane
    Wyatt Crane
    MS Spanish Teacher
    Washington University in St. Louis, College of Arts and Sciences - B.A
    New York University - M.S.
  • Photo of Isabel Dominguez Seoane
    Isabel Dominguez Seoane
    HS Spanish teacher
  • Photo of Aaron Feigenbaum
    Aaron Feigenbaum
    MS/HS French Teacher
  • Photo of Vanesa Gutierrez Redondo
    Vanesa Gutierrez Redondo
    MS Spanish Teacher
  • Photo of Carmen Herrera
    Carmen Herrera
    World Languages Teacher and House Advisor
    University of Cordoba, Spain
    Middlesex University, London
    University of Bari, Italy
  • Photo of Fatima Mhinat
    Fatima Mhinat
    Middle and High School French Teacher
    University of Delaware - M.A.
    Université de Savoie, France - M.A.
    Université de Savoie, France - D.E.A
  • Photo of Maria Nebres
    Maria Nebres
    Middle and High School Spanish Teacher
    University at Albany - B.A.
    University of Salamanca - M.A.
  • Photo of Cortney Norris
    Cortney Norris
    Middle and High School Latin Teacher
    University of Washington - B.A.
    University of California Berkeley - M.A.
  • Photo of Carlos San Juan
    Carlos San Juan
    Middle and High School Spanish Teacher
    Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico(UNAM) - B.S.
    City University of New York-Baruch College - M.S. Applied Mathematics For Finance
    State University of New York - B.A. Mathematics and Technology
    Klingenstein Center for Independent School Leadership, Columbia University - M.Ed. Organization and Leadership
  • Photo of S. Smith
    S. Smith
    Middle and High School Latin Teacher
    Washington University, Saint Louis - B.A.
    Teachers College, Columbia University - M.A.
    Teachers College, Columbia University - Ph.D.
  • Photo of Verónica Valentín
    Verónica Valentín
    World and Classical Languages Teacher
    Bank Street Graduate School of Education - M.S.
    Universidad de Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras - B.A.
  • Photo of Cindy Wu
    Cindy Wu
    World Languages Teacher
    National Hsinchu University - B.A.
    New York University - M.A.
(Grades K-3) 53 East 91st Street
New York, NY 10128
General: (212) 423-5200 | Admissions: (212) 423-5463
General: info@dalton.org | Admissions: fpadmissions@dalton.org

(Gr. 4 Dalton East & PE Center) 200 East 87th Street
New York, NY 10128
General: (212) 423-5200 | Admissions: (212) 423-5361
General: info@dalton.org | Admissions: admissionsmshs@dalton.org

(Grade 5-12) 108 East 89th Street
New York, NY 10128
General: (212) 423-5200 | Admissions: (212) 423-5262
General: info@dalton.org | Admissions: admissionsmshs@dalton.org