High School
Departments & Courses, In Brief

High School Courses

Engineering

The Computer Science and Engineering programs at Dalton today provide an opportunity for students to learn how to break down and tackle large challenges. By emphasizing how to embrace experimentation and failure, the program gives students a system for meeting future challenges. In the First Program, educational technologists from the New Lab work closely with faculty to introduce technology tools for learning in purposeful, responsible, and developmentally appropriate ways that support the core curriculum. Within this context, New Lab collaborates with First Program teachers and computer science department colleagues to introduce all K-3 youngsters to the field of computer science. In addition, technologists work with teachers to introduce students to engineering activities. Often these explorations begin as an individual class project that is then shared with the rest of the grade and division for potential expansion in subsequent years. Critical to both pursuits is a value on the iterative process. Computer science and engineering experiences are seen as tools for Assignments in all subjects for problem solving, self-expression, and collaboration.

Students practice their engineering skills in Dalton’s robotics courses and in various competitions. Recently, each mixed-age class designs, builds, and programs a robot for the FIRST Tech Challenge, an international competition. Fabrication techniques used include 3D printing, laser cutting, milling, and traditional machining. The Dalton Robotics Team has placed in the top one percent and advanced to the World Championship in each of the past many years.

Learn More About Engineering
  • Robotics

    Students in this course will get hands-on experience in robotics and project management.  Working as members of a team, they will design, build, and program robots for the FIRST Tech Challenge, an international robotics competition.  During the course, students will engage in the full engineering process, including conducting research, designing, fabricating prototypes and testing their ideas many times in search of an optimal solution.  Although many of the assignments require students to work in a group setting, each student will also be assessed on the effective implementation of this iterative process.  Classes meet three times a week and each student is required to attend at least one after-school build session.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Introduction to 3-D modeling and printing

    This course is an introduction to 3D printing and parametric modeling software.  Students will gain a working knowledge of this process from digital design to physical product. In addition to skill-based instruction, students will be asked to develop personal projects in response to open-ended prompts.  Students will be asked to think critically about imagery, functionality and the logic of an object in space. No previous knowledge of 3D printing is necessary. Individuals with an existing interest in art or design are strongly encouraged to take the course.

    Meets 1x per week 5:00 to 8:00 PM
    Fall Semester Course, 0.50 credits
  • Engineering & Design Workshop

    Students in the Engineering & Design Workshop will have the opportunity to create their own sneakers, consumer electronics, and products for social change. Students will use both traditional and digital tools to design, prototype, and fabricate a consumer product that fits the assigned constraints. The final project will receive feedback from industry professionals. While no prior experience with fabrication is required, students with experience in fabrication software (such as CAD, CAM, 3D printing, or laser cutting) will have an opportunity to further develop and master this skill set.

    Fall/Spring Semester Course, 0.50 credits
  • The Choreography of Technology

    In this course, students will choose human movement (either artistic or functional) and program a humanoid robot to do that behavior as realistically as possible. In order to do so, they will need to learn about how the human body moves, the neuroscience behind why we make emotional connections to inanimate objects, and the basics of robotic control systems. The class will meet during the school day and students will schedule time with the robot after school at build sessions. Previous programming and/or dance experience is not required, but students with expertise will have the opportunity to use it.

    *cross-listed with Engineering

    Prerequisite: Robotics, Computer Science 1, OR a Dance Department course 
    Spring Semester Course, 0.50 credits

    Requires Preapproval
  • Engineering Project: Peru

    In this class, students will be asked to work as an Engineering team to partner with Global Works to design and perform a service project for a Quechua Village outside of Moray in Peru. The village has access to running water for 20 minutes per day from a municipal system that pipes water directly into their homes, and most homes have limited ability to store the water for usage. The students will help design a home water reservoir system that can be built out of locally available parts to Peru and will travel to the village to build them. 

    Spring Semester Course, 0.5 Credit
  • Introduction to Digital Fabrication: Art and Design

    This course is an introduction to digital fabrication, focusing on 3-D printing and laser cutting. Using Fusion 360 and Adobe Illustrator, students will move through a complete design process from creating a 3-D CAD model to printing and assembling their completed physical objects. In addition to skill-based instruction with the software and tools above, students will develop creative 2-D and 3-D design projects to help them begin to think about how to leverage the unique affordances of this method of working in support of their projects in art and design. Individuals with a current interest in art or design with no previous experience in digital fabrication are strongly encouraged to take the course.

    *cross-listed with Visual Arts 

    Prerequisite: None
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Introduction to Digital Fabrication: Art and Design

    This course is an introduction to digital fabrication, focusing on 3-D printing and laser cutting. Using Fusion 360 and Adobe Illustrator, students will move through a complete design process from creating a 3-D CAD model to printing and assembling their completed physical objects. In addition to skill-based instruction with the software and tools above, students will develop creative 2-D and 3-D design projects to help them begin to think about how to leverage the unique affordances of this method of working in support of their projects in art and design. Individuals with a current interest in art or design with no previous experience in digital fabrication are strongly encouraged to take the course.

    *cross-listed with Visual Arts 

    Prerequisite: None
    Semester Course, 0.5 credits
  • IS: Engineering

    Independent studies are opportunities for 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students to pursue ideas and passions not covered by current course work.  

    Students must complete this form to apply for preapproval.

    Requires Preapproval
    Graded Pass/Fail
    Fall or Spring Semester Course, 0.25 credits
  • Wooden Puppet Workshop

    Wooden Puppet Workshop is a course that combines illustration, woodcarving, design and engineering skills to bring wood puppets to life. Students will learn wood carving, character design and  puppetry mechanics including pivot systems, hand rods, and articulation to build wooden puppets. Projects will include wood carving lessons using various carving tools focused on carving straight grain and on a curve in order to craft tabletop and rod puppets along with other forms of puppet articulation. Each project will culminate in a working puppet. The class is open to students 9th - 12th grade students, no wood carving experience needed. 

    Fall/Spring Semester Course, 0.50 credits

Faculty

  • Photo of Danah Screen
    Danah Screen
    Computer Science and Engineering Teacher
    Fordham University - M.S.
    Barnard College, Columbia University - B.A.
  • Photo of Shahar Atary
    Shahar Atary
    Dalton Fellow in the Science Department
    University of Florida - B.S.
    University of Colorado Law School - J.D.
  • Photo of Julietta Garbasz
    Julietta Garbasz
    HS Math Teacher
    Yale University - B.A.
  • Saber Khan
    Computer Science Department Chair
    Kenyon College - B.A.
    San Francisco State University - M.S.
  • Photo of Larisa Oldmixon-Berson
    Larisa Oldmixon-Berson
    MS Robotics
  • Photo of Rob Quatrone
    Rob Quatrone
    Middle School Engineering Coordinator
    Columbia College - B.A.
  • Photo of Charles Forster Stewert
    Charles Forster Stewert
    High School Assistant Director for Operations
    University of Pennsylvania - B.A.
    French Culinary Institute - Diplome de Boulanger
  • Photo of Sloan Warren
    Sloan Warren
    Assistant Director of the Middle School for Operations
    University of Pennsylvania - B.A.
    Yale University - Ph.D
(Grades K-3) 53 East 91st Street
New York, NY 10128
General: (212) 423-5200 | Admissions: (212) 423-5463
General: info@dalton.org | Admissions: fpadmissions@dalton.org

(Gr. 4 Dalton East & PE Center) 200 East 87th Street
New York, NY 10128
General: (212) 423-5200 | Admissions: (212) 423-5361
General: info@dalton.org | Admissions: admissionsmshs@dalton.org

(Grade 5-12) 108 East 89th Street
New York, NY 10128
General: (212) 423-5200 | Admissions: (212) 423-5262
General: info@dalton.org | Admissions: admissionsmshs@dalton.org