High School
Departments & Courses, In Brief

High School Courses

World and Classical Languages

“The man who knows no foreign language knows nothing of his mother tongue.” Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

The goal of the Dalton’s Foreign Language Department is to teach students to think and express themselves in another language. This knowledge enables students to gain a more profound understanding of another culture than would otherwise be possible. Students progressively develop skills in understanding and communicating the language being studied. The study of a foreign language encompasses the language, literature, history, art, and customs of a people. In the course of study of any of the languages, students are exposed to different cultures, traditions, and ways of living through video, hypermedia, and trips to cultural events and museums.

The languages offered at Dalton are: French, Spanish, Latin, Classical Greek, and Mandarin. We require that students study any language chosen for three consecutive years in High School. We encourage students who are capable, to include the study of a second language during their career at Dalton.
  • 19th Century French Lit 'A'

    Students explore literary and artistic movements in 19th-century France. Guy de Maupassant's Pierre et Jean helps establish what was meant at the time by the terms naturalism and realism. We read Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, in its entirety, George Sand's Elle et lui, and then the poetry of two generations of poets. In April, while reading Jean Renoir's biography of his father, painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, students present multi-media portraits of French painters and composers and their works. A visit to the Metropolitan Museum supplements an on-line art gallery and research materials in the library.

    Prerequisite: one year of elective or departmental permission
  • A Changing China

    A Changing China assumes a working familiarity with the basic structures of Mandarin and a corpus of approximately 700 common Chinese characters. In this course, students use their textbook, A New China, as a tool to explore a large variety of authentic, contemporary Mandarin-language materials, including websites, television programs, excerpts from articles, opinion pieces, fiction and films. Through analysis of these and other media, students become familiar with mainstream and alternative Chinese attitudes, opinions and styles. Through dialogue, role-play, research and writing, students learn to express and understand educated views of Chinese culture and society. Students acquire roughly 300 new characters, and class is conducted entirely in Mandarin.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Arabic Language through Culture I

    This full-year course will highlight Modern Standard Arabic and some of the spoken dialect of the Levant. With an emphasis on Arabic culture, students will learn commonly used expressions and phrases from the Levant area. Students will develop their skills in listening, reading, writing, forming grammatically correct structured sentences, and most importantly, conversation. This will be accomplished through podcasts, videos, culture circles discussions, web conferencing, and collaborations in group projects. In addition, students will have direct conversations with native speakers of Arabic through a virtual club called “Shu Fe Maa Fe,” where students are required to meet online with their assigned partner and learn about a certain cultural topic every week, such as traditional food, greetings, gestures, values, history and more. Since Arabic is becoming one of the most functional languages in the world, especially in the areas of commerce, business, and trade, students participating in this course can avail themselves of the opportunity to learn the language in a highly stimulating and rich cultural context.

    Requires Preapproval
  • Caesar

    Students translate selections from Caesar's De Bello Gallico.  This is the first class in which students make the leap to pure translation of text.  Grammar and solid, idiomatic translation are a continued focus.  Historiography and the role of Rome in Gaul and neighboring states are important considerations, as is the Roman army. A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit, approval required
    Text: Second Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade
    Requires Preapproval
  • Caesar 'A'

    Students translate selections from Caesar's De Bello Gallico. This is the first class in which students make the leap to pure translation of text. Grammar and solid, idiomatic translation are a continued focus. Historiography and the role of Rome in Gaul and neighboring states are important considerations, as is the Roman army. A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the 99 department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all Alevel assignments. 
     
    Requirements: Department chair approval required Text: Second Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Chinese History Through Stories

    Chinese History Through Stories is a course for students who have successfully completed A Changing China or are comparably conversant and literate in Mandarin. In this class, students will read and analyze short stories of major political, military, economic, cultural, and technological events and influential figures of Chinese history, and their impact on and relevance to modern day China. We also examine and learn to use the ever-so-important four-character idioms along the way. We watch and discuss several movies and movie excerpts based on popular historical events and legends such as Hua Mulan, Hero, and The Battle at Red Cliff, and, when appropriate, compare them with similar Western stories.  Successful students emerge with a set of cultural and linguistic tools that allow them to engage China in a nuanced, sophisticated way. Class is conducted entirely in Mandarin.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Cicero

    Selections from the first Catilinarian and other works, which may include court cases, political speeches or private letters, introduce students the richness of Cicero's style. Historical, biographical, socio-political and cultural backgrounds are essential components of this course. Students also do work with figures of speech and rhetorical devices. 
     
    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.  
     
    Department chair pre-approval required.
    Text: Third Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade, varied texts
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Cicero 'A'

    What happens when writers decide to compose in a language that is not their native one? What do they lose and, most importantly, what do they gain? This course explores these questions and encourages students to find their own original voice in French by 1) exploring universal themes that are personal and meaningful (such as childhood, identity, love, and family) and how each author expresses those themes into their work 2) engaging in writing exercises, such as le pastiche, in which they will add their own creative spin to a theme, just as Marcel Duchamp did when he added a mustache to the Mona Lisa. The first semester focuses on the art of the short story where students discuss what constitutes a compelling narrative in the works of writers such as Guy de Maupassant, Émile Zola, Marcel Proust, Jean-Marie le Clézio, Michel Tournier, Georges Perec, Simone de Beauvoir, Nancy Huston and Andrée Chedid. The second semester concentrates on the poem by examining all forms of the poem, from the classical to the surreal, through the lens of poets such as Villon, Rimbaud, Baudelaire, Apollinaire, Lautréamont, Michaux, Ponge et Jaccottet. This course is conducted in a workshop-type format in that students are expected to not only generate and revise work on a regular basis, but to read and critique that of their classmates in a constructive matter. At the end of each semester, students put together a literary review of their best work as well as a reading to share with the rest of the French community at Dalton, showing that one the most important reasons to learn a second language is to have a new, creative avenue to tell your story, write your poem.
     
    Prerequisite: French 4A and/or one year of elective or departmental permission
    Full year course: 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Finding North: A Creative Writing Course in French ‘A’

    What happens when writers decide to compose in a language that is not their native one? What do they lose and, most importantly, what do they gain? This course explores these questions and encourages students to find their original voice in French by 1). exploring universal themes that are personal and meaningful (such as childhood, identity, love, and family) and how each author expresses those themes into their work and 2) engaging in writing exercises, such as le pastiche, in which they will add their creative spin to a theme, just as Marcel Duchamp did when he added a mustache to the Mona Lisa. The first semester focuses on the art of the short story where students discuss what constitutes a compelling narrative in the works of writers such as Guy de Maupassant, Émile Zola, Marcel Proust, Jean-Marie le Clézio, Michel Tournier, Georges Perec, Simone de Beauvoir, Nancy Huston and Andrée Chedid. The second semester concentrates on the poem by examining all forms of the poem, from the classical to the surreal, through the lens of poets such as Villon, Rimbaud, Baudelaire, Apollinaire, Lautréamont, Michaux, Ponge et Jaccottet. This course is conducted in a workshop-type format in that students are expected to not only generate and revise work on a regular basis, but to read and critique that of their classmates in a constructive matter. At the end of each semester, students put together a literary review of their best work as well as a reading to share with the rest of the French community at Dalton, showing that one the most important reasons to learn a second language is to have a new, creative avenue to tell your story, write your poem.
     
    Prerequisite: French 4A and/or one year of elective or departmental permission
    Full year course: 1.0 credit
  • French 1

    In French, we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first three years of study. Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all grammar points and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • French 1/2

    Description Pending
  • French 2

    In French, we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first three years of study. Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all grammar points and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • French 3

    In French, we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first three years of study. Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all grammar points and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • French 3 'A'

    In French, we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first three years of study. Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all grammar points and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • French 4

    In French, we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first three years of study. Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all grammar points and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • French 4 'A'

    In French, we use Vis-à-vis textbooks for the first three years of study. Individual assignments present grammar formally and embedded in authentic cultural contexts. From French II onward, students read and discuss short novels and stories for vocabulary enrichment. By the end of level IV, students have seen all grammar points and are working to enhance their proficiency in speaking, writing and reading in French.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • French Autobiography

    Requires Preapproval
  • French Autobiography 'A'

    Requires Preapproval
  • French Cinema 'A'

    This course aims at enhancing the students’ understanding of the culture of France and the Francophone world by focusing on the relation of films to French history and culture.  It examines how French society and contemporary filmmakers view and address major historical, social and cultural events. Students will be introduced to a broad range of contemporary issues: the legacy of colonialism and decolonization, history of immigration and access to French citizenship, social exclusion, social unrest: (Mai 68 and riots of the suburbs in 2005), secularism (laïcité), economic challenges (welfare state, globalization, and the healthcare deficit). During the study of each film, students research and analyze cultural, social, and historical themes. This course is designed to improve all four skills – reading, writing, speaking and listening. Reading and writing skills in particular are developed through the analysis of cultural readings. In addition, students have the opportunity to create projects, and discuss, and debate a variety of themes in French.
     
    Prerequisite:  French 4, French 4‘A’, or above
    Full year course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • French Nationalism

    L'expression du nationalisme dans la littérature francophone / 

    This course offers an analytical insight into a selection of works by French-speaking contemporary writers from the Caribbean and North and West Africa and the determining social, cultural and political events that helped shape their literary environment. We read authors including Ousmane Sembène, Leopold S. Senghor, Aimé Césaire, Frank Fanon, Mouloud Feraoun, Assia Djebbar, Tahar Ben Djelloun, and Henry Alleg, among others.  Students will explore the idea of “Négritude” through an in-depth study of works by the members of  "l'étudiant noir" a group established to eradicate the colonial imposed artificial divisions of the various African nations and to cement the African man under one banner. Literature and film help to contextualize the political backdrop of post-World War II African politics and the elements that paved the way to independence for one-third of the continent in the early 1960s. This context situates the nationalistic sentiments in the selected readings. Along with readings, students strengthen their listening skills by viewing several notable films on this topic. They will also write in-class and at home essays and prepare class presentations to help extend and expand their oral and written proficiency in French. 

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission of the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Full year course, 1.0 credit
    Prerequisite:  French 4, French 4‘A’, or above
    Requires Preapproval
  • French Poetry 'A'

    Description currently unavailable.
    Requires Preapproval
  • Hispanic Cinema

    This course offers a window into Spanish and Latin American societies and cultures through cinema. It works toward broadening the knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world and offers students the opportunity to exercise the spoken and written language. The curriculum includes films from four countries that broadly represent geographical and cultural regions of the Spanish-speaking world and the major centers of film production: Cuba, Argentina, Spain, and Mexico.  Projects allow students to study films from other countries as well. The students make brief presentations on pertinent historical, cultural, and political issues for each country that serve as the context for that country’s films. Students also keep a regular diary to note responses, observations, impressions, and questions about the scenes viewed in class. Semester projects allow the student to explore film further in a scholarly or creative manner, for example, the study of a film or director, a sound score, cinematographic techniques or the creation of a film short, music for a scene, or an original script.  
     
    A-level credit is available for this course with permission of the teacher and the department chair.Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class.  A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.

    Requires Preapproval
  • IS: Language

    Description currently unavailable.
  • Japanese Language through Culture I

    This full-year course is a unique combination of Japanese culture and language, weaving cultural comparison with the study of basic Japanese language and grammar. While examining various cultural topics such as literature, art, lifestyle and economy, students will learn the basics of the Japanese writing system (Hiragana and Katakana), grammar and vocabulary. Through varied synchronous and asynchronous assignments, including hands-on projects and face-to-face communications, students will develop their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. The cultural study and discussion will be conducted in English, with topics alternating every two to three weeks. The ultimate goal of this course is to raise awareness and appreciation of different cultures through learning the basics of the Japanese language. The focus of this course will be 60 percent on language and 40 percent on culture. This course is appropriate for beginner-level students.

    Requires Preapproval
  • Japanese Language through Culture II

    Through language learning, students in this course share their voices, cultivate global perspectives, and foster appreciation of self and others. Students expand their knowledge of the basic skills introduced in Japanese Language through Culture I while further developing their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Each unit follows the IPA model (Integrated Performance Assessment), blending three modes of communication: interpretation of authentic material in Japanese, synchronous and asynchronous practice in speaking and writing, and oral and written presentations. Each unit focuses on one of the following cultural topics: Design and Expression, Ecology, Entertainment, East meets West, Harmony, and Nature. In addition, students will have the opportunity to select and pursue topics of their own interest. Grammar topics will cover the essential forms that are typically introduced in the second and third year of a high school Japanese program. By learning the Dictionary Form, Nominalizer, TE form, TA form, NAI form, and Noun Modifier, students will be able to add more complexity to their sentence construction. In doing so, they will shift from forming simple sentences to communicating in a coherent paragraph. As online learners, students are expected to exhibit superb time management and communication skills, as well as to take ownership of their learning. While grammar instruction will be delivered through asynchronous work and face-to-face meetings, much of the course content will be curated and created by students through their research and collaboration.

    Prerequisite: Japanese Language through Culture I or permission from the instructor.

    Requires Preapproval
  • Lands/People of Contemporary China

    Lands and People of Contemporary China is a seminar-level course. Chinese History Through Stories or equivalent proficiency with spoken and written Mandarin is prerequisite. Students study in depth the people and culture of China by taking a simulated journey around major regions of the country. While the focus is mainly contemporary, we examine historical roots of certain customs and landmarks.  China is a diverse country with more than 50 ethnic groups, all of whom have rich culture and customs. Even among the majority Han ethnicity, every region has its own unique flavor.  So what is China?  What does it mean for people and things to be Chinese? In this course, we examine the different people, customs, food and landmarks of mainland China.  We read authentic Chinese texts from print and digital media, and explore authentic audiovisual content available on the Internet. The class is discussion-based and participation is crucial. Students must be able to read authentic materials and to compose short and meaningful essays in Chinese. 

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin 1

    Beginning study of grammar, vocabulary, and translation.

    Text: First Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin 2

    Continuation of Latin 1. Upper-level grammar is introduced alongside prolonged translations.

    Prerequisites, approval required
    Text: First Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade.

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin 3 - Selected Latin Authors

    Students in this course review the curriculum of upper-level grammar and syntax in tandem with the translation of texts taken from ancient authors, including Livy, Eutropius, Caesar and Ovid. This class emphasizes the development of translation skills, the ability to identify grammar and understand syntax, and the expansion of vocabulary. 
     
    Prerequisite: Latin 2 Full Year Course, 1.0 credit, approval required 
    Text: Second Year Latin, Jenney, Scudder and Baade

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin 3 - Selected Latin Authors 'A'

    Course description pending.

    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin Lyric Poetry

    Students read the poetry of Catullus and Horace.  Poems are read with attention paid to themes, poetic devices, contemporary cultural philosophy, historical background and metrical forms.  The Greek influences on Catullus and Horace are examined, as is modern poetry, which has been influenced to a great extent by these authors.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Texts vary
    Requires Preapproval
  • Latin Lyric Poetry 'A'

    Students read the poetry of Catullus and Horace. Poems are read with attention paid to themes, poetic devices, contemporary cultural philosophy, historical background and metrical forms. Students examine the Greek influences on Catullus and Horace, as has modern poetry been influenced to a great extent by these authors. 
     
    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments. 
     
    Prerequisites: approval of department chair,
    Texts: vary

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Lit of the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean 'A'

    This course explores the Spanish-speaking Caribbean: Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic through its literature. We read and discuss poetry, essays, short stories, plays, and novels that inform us about the peoples, cultures, history, and profound issues of this region.  The course is organized around five basic topics: Conquest and Colonization, Identity, Migration, the Diaspora, and differences and commonalities among the three islands.  Assessments are not always limited to written tests and essays.  The students are able to design projects according to their passion: art, music, food, dance, politics and history. We also see how these islands have certain experiences and cultural elements in common with the French and English-speaking Antilles and how their history and people are tied to our own.
     
    Prerequisite: One year of elective or departmental permission.
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Literature and Food in Latin America 'A'

    (in Spanish, cross-listed Parkhurst and World Languages)

    In this course, students are invited to bring their appetite for all things gourmet as we explore 20th century Latin American literary works through the lens of food.  We analyze the many flavors of culinary literature, written for and by native Spanish speakers. We also compare and contrast cultures and perspectives through topics such as Poets in the Kitchen, Authors and their Favorite Dishes, Literary Recipes for Love, and Savory Myths.  By the end of the year, students are able to understand the complex network of historical, political, cultural and social contexts that influenced the creation of these works through the thematic ingredients of society, gender, time, space and reality.  Our menu of readings includes short stories, poetry and short fiction by Cortázar, Esquivel, Borges and Neruda among others.  Students have the opportunity to improve their reading, writing and oral skills via class discussions, a portfolio de commentaries and self-reflection, and in-class essays.  ¡Buen provecho!
     
    Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4 and departmental permission
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 1

    Texbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1 and 2, Integrated Chinese at levels 3 and 4 and A New China for A Changing China.  Ancillary materials include audiovisual materials, online exercises, interactive flash cards, and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.  

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 2

    Texbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1 and 2, Integrated Chinese at levels 3 and 4 and A New China for A Changing China.  Ancillary materials include audiovisual materials, online exercises, interactive flash cards, and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.  

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 3

    Texbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1 and 2, Integrated Chinese at levels 3 and 4 and A New China for A Changing China.  Ancillary materials include audiovisual materials, online exercises, interactive flash cards, and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.  

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Mandarin Chinese 4

    Texbooks for Mandarin are Huanying at levels 1 and 2, Integrated Chinese at levels 3 and 4 and A New China for A Changing China.  Ancillary materials include audiovisual materials, online exercises, interactive flash cards, and other independent learning resources to enhance students' experience.  Students are introduced to Chinese culture and traditions through a variety of authentic Mandarin-language materials, excursions, and in school visits by experts.  

    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 1

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues. Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, the course exposes students to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world. 
     
    Prerequisites: approval required
     
    Full Year Course, 1 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 2

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues. Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, the course exposes students to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world.
     
    Prerequisites: approval required
     
    Full Year Course, 1 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 3

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues. Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, the course exposes students to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world. 
     
    Prerequisites: approval required
     
    Full Year Course, 1 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 3 'A'

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues. Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, the course exposes students to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world. 
     
    Prerequisites: approval required
     
    Full Year Course, 1 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 4

    Students work together in developing language proficiency, applying the grammatical structures by practicing them in a variety of situations including discussions, presentations and dialogues. Through cultural readings and audiovisual materials, the course exposes students to the Spanish spoken in different parts of the world. 
     
    Prerequisites: approval required
     
    Full Year Course, 1 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish 4 ‘A’: We New Yorkers “Nosotros los Neoyorquinos”

    (in Spanish, cross-listed Parkhurst and World Languages)

    This interdisciplinary course, entitled “Nosotros los Neoyorquinos,” is organized into thematic units, the course involves students in a study of the historical, social and cultural impact of Spanish-speaking New Yorkers, both in the present time, and throughout history. Students strengthen and further develop their speaking, listening, reading and writing proficiency in Spanish as they explore different Latin-American communities in the five boroughs of New York City. Students interact with Latinos in and around New York City, and use technology to connect with Spanish-speakers around the world in order to conduct oral history interviews, design and conduct research, and create joint projects. Major themes include communities (family, school, neighborhood, city), immigration (movement of people into and out of the city, population density over time, etc.), the environment (the use of natural resources, etc.), Spanish language and cultures (etymology, how cultures evolve, encounter of cultures and civilizations), and the arts (dance, literature, visual arts, etc.).  Students’ progress is assessed through evaluation of proficiency in language as well as demonstrated understanding of cultural products, practices, and perspectives.
     
    Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval

  • Spanish Conversation and Composition

    The Conversation and Composition course aims to strengthen speaking and writing skills in Spanish.  We begin the year with a discussion of potentially controversial topics and questions pertaining to each.  Students choose discussion topics and the order in which they are debated.  In the past, these themes have included alcohol and drug policies, censorship, violence, affirmative action, human rights, immigration, and current issues.  In–class discussions and debates typically involve initial free discussion, identification of key questions, some research and a paper or a formal in-class presentation.  Writing may take a creative approach in addition to the formal paper.  Students are expected to come out of each unit better informed about the different sides of each issue.  Reading articles and literary excerpts, listening to music and watching movies are additional means for students to expand their breadth of expression and understanding of culture in Spanish.
     
    Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4 or departmental permission
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish: Building Bridges 'A'

    This course is a capstone project that connects the Dalton academic experience with the community, having as its backbone Spanish language, literature, and culture, and as its lab the city of New York. The students coming into it are active creators of content, which will allow them to see beforehand “the whole job and the purpose of it all,” as Parkhurst conceived the assignment. Following the principles of freedom and cooperation, as envisioned by our founder, we will use a blended learning environment in which the students will be able to work upon their project in their own time within a structured frame. They will work on projects according to their personal interests, from creating public service announcements to be aired on public-access TV pertaining minority voices in the city, power and class, linguistic and artistic expression, to conducting scientific studies on the environmental impact of private or public enterprises in specific Hispanic areas of the city, among many other possibilities. Students select one novel in Spanish that serves as the frame that ties the group together and function as the sounding board for their personal experiences in the community. There are 40 required hours outside of class working with the Hispanic population. The course is open to juniors and seniors who have completed up to Advanced Spanish 4 and beyond. 
     
    Prerequisite: Two years of elective or departmental permission. 
     
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
  • Spanish: Language and Culture

    Requires Preapproval
  • Spanish: Language and Culture ‘A’

    Lengua y Cultura” will give the students the opportunity to explore Hispanic culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Through this course, students develop awareness of and appreciation for the different cultures throughout the Hispanic world and compare them with their own communities. Some of the topics covered are Global challenges, the Arts, Contemporary Life, Communities, Science and Technology, Personality and Personalities, Hispanic history and Literature. Students present their opinions and develop arguments, both orally and in writing. They learn how to identify different registers and address different audiences (e.g. how to write an e-mail, text message, a formal letter, an essay, how to do an oral presentation, etc.). Students are exposed to Spanish spoken by native speakers, with different regional pronunciations through authentic cultural audioclips and videos. Part of this course is developed by the teacher, and part of it is developed by the students, according to their interests and passions.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4 or above
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Virgil

    Students translate selected passages from several books of the Aeneid, concentrating on Vergil’s style.  Discussions and assignments focus on literal and free translation of the text, on poetic meter, major themes, the figurative language of epic verse, and the socio-political reformation of the Augustan Age.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Text: Vergil’s Aeneid, Pharr
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit
    Requires Preapproval
  • Virgil 'A'

    Students translate selected passages from several books of the Aeneid, concentrating on Vergil’s style.  Discussions and assignments focus on literal and free translation of the text, on poetic meter, major themes, the figurative language of epic verse, and the socio-political reformation of the Augustan Age.

    A-level credit is available for this course with permission from the teacher and the department chair. Students may choose to undertake A-level assignments, the scope of which exceed that of the regular class. A-level credit will be awarded retroactively upon satisfactory completion of all A-level assignments.
     
    Text: Vergil’s Aeneid, Pharr
    Full Year Course, 1.0 credit, approval required
    Requires Preapproval

Faculty

  • Lori Langer de Ramirez

    Director of World and Classical Languages
    (212) 423-5482
    SUNY, New Paltz - B.A.
    CUNY, Queens College - M.S.
    Teachers College, Columbia University - Ed.D.
  • Allison Albino

    French Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3078
    New York University - M.A.
    Sarah Lawrence College - B.A.
  • Marc Bendali

    Middle and High School French Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3150
    University of Algiers - B.A.
    Institut Charles V, Université de Paris VII - M.A.
    Boston University - M.S.
    Tufts University, The Fletcher School - A.M.
  • Flor Berman

    World Languages Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3131
    University Center Cesar Ritz - B.S.
    New Jersey City University - M.A.
    Montclair State University - M.A.
  • Johanna Braff

    Middle and High School Latin Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3021
    Swarthmore College - B.A.
    University of Pennsylvania - Post Baccalaureate
    University of Maryland - M.A.
    C.U.N.Y. - M.Phil.
  • Eva Burgoyne

    (212) 423-5495 x3189
    Seattle University - B.A.
    Seattle University - M.Ed.
  • Tzu-Chih Chien

    Middle and High School Mandarin Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3009
    University of California, Berkeley - B.A.
    NYU - M.A.
  • Tracy Christopher

    Middle and High School French Teacher
    (212) 423-5296
    Washington University - B.A., summa cum laude
    New York University - M.A.
  • Carmen Herrera

    World Languages Teacher
    (212) 423-5200
    University of Cordoba, Spain
    Middlesex University, London
    University of Bari, Italy
  • Maria Madinaveitia

    Middle and High School Spanish Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3148
    Teachers College, Columbia University - M.A.
  • Fatima Mhinat

    Middle and High School French Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3008
    University of Delaware - M.A.
    Université de Savoie, France - M.A.
    Université de Savoie, France - D.E.A
  • Maria Nebres

    Middle and High School Spanish Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3149
    University at Albany - B.A.
    University of Salamanca - M.A.
  • Cortney Norris

    Middle and High School Latin Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3164
    University of Washington - B.A.
    University of California Berkeley - M.A.
  • Carlos San Juan

    Middle and High School Spanish Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x8626
    Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico(UNAM) - B.S.
    City University of New York-Baruch College - M.S. Applied Mathematics For Finance
    State University of New York - B.A. Mathematics and Technology
    Klingenstein Center for Independent School Leadership, Columbia University - M.Ed. Organization and Leadership
  • Hugh Thornton

    Middle and High School Latin Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3207
    Columbia University - B.A.
    Graduate Center of City University of New York - M.A.
  • Michele Viard-Andre

    Middle and High School French and Spanish Teacher
    (212) 423-5304
    University of Puerto Rico - B.A.
    New York University - M.A.
  • Cindy Wu

    World Languages Teacher
    (212) 423-5495 x3168
    National Hsinchu University - B.A.
    New York University - M.A.